What's new in 1.1.0? X

mmCalc

"" - 35mm equivalent below


Explanation.


Let’s start with the simple part. Since you are using a/an "" or crop sensor, your camera is going to “crop” out the middle part of the image circle, essentially “zooming” you in more. The amount that you are cropped in is referred to as the crop factor. Your "" sensor has a crop factor of "" meaning you must multiply your focal length by this number to get the new field of view. This image will give you a basic idea of what’s happening here.

Now for the more advanced part... Although your lens is “” it will have the equivalent depth of field to an “” lens. The amount of light your lens lets in will not change, only the depth of field or the “blurry part” of the image.

This is a super basic explanation of crop factor and how it effects your lenses. There are some more advanced topics to this such as compression, but we won't cover that here.

Explanation.


Since you are using a/an "" or medium format sensor, your camera isn’t going to crop anything. When using medium format lenses, they are designed to cover the larger sensor, but with the larger image circle, the field of view also widens. Your "" sensor has a "crop factor" of "" meaning you must multiply your focal length by this number to get the new field of view.

Just as your field of view widens, so does your perceived aperture. Although your lens is “” it will have the equivalent depth of field to an “” lens. The amount of light your lens lets in will not change, only the depth of field or the “blurry part” of the image.

This is a super basic explanation of medium format crop factor and how it effects your lenses. There are some more advanced topics to this such as compression, but we won't cover that here.